If an applicant has taken a different English language test, the following are acceptable equivalent alternatives:

Test

Level required

Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE)/C1 Advanced

Overall score of 185 or above, with at least 176 in each component

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE)/C2 Proficiency

Overall score of 200 or above, with at least 176 in each component

Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic)

Overall score of 67 or above, with at least 61 in each component

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) internet-based test (IBT)

Overall score of 95 or above, with at least 21 in listening, 22 in speaking and writing, and 23 in reading

Applicants must meet the English Language requirement at the time of submitting their application to Oak Hill and should have been awarded the relevant test result within the two years prior to the start of the programme that they are applying for.

An applicant whose first language is not English will be considered to have satisfied the requirement if they meet all of the following criteria:

1. They have successfully completed a qualification equivalent to a UK Bachelor’s degree or higher taught and assessed in English in a majority English-speaking country. Qualifications obtained by distance learning cannot be accepted for English language purposes.

2. If the degree was completed more than two years prior to applying to study at Oak Hill, the applicant must provide evidence at application stage of ongoing use of English. This could take the form of living in a majority English-speaking country1 or working in an occupation that requires regular use of English.

3. Throughout the application process, from application form to interview, the applicant must demonstrate English proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing.

1 Majority English-speaking countries are defined by the British government as follows: Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Canada, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Ireland, Jamaica, New Zealand, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, United Kingdom and USA.

Postgraduate Diploma Theology

The PGDip makes our training for gospel ministry available more widely at a postgraduate level. What distinguishes the PGDip from the MA and MTheol (year 4) is that it does not require a research component, although you can do a short research project if you choose.

You take four modules to earn the PGDip. This fits well for many people who want to study and prepare for ministry at a postgraduate level, but for whom independent research is not the right fit.

The programme can be taken over one year full time or two years part time.

Essential information
Course name
Postgraduate Diploma Theology
Mode of study
One year full time
Two years part time
Total credits
120 credits
Level of award
Level 7 (Postgraduate)
Location
Oak Hill College, Southgate, London N14 4PS
Fees
2019/20 fees:
Tuition Fees per year are £9,000 (full time) or £4,500 (part time, payable for each year)
Middlesex University Registration Fee:  £761 per year

We are planning to publish the 2020/21 fees in Spring 2020.
Fees details
Entry requirements
The normal entrance requirement is a UK Honours degree in Theology (classified 2.2 or above). Normally, broader degrees in Religious Studies and other subjects will not provide an adequate grounding for the programme. Students without a degree in Theology may qualify for admission if they are able to demonstrate both academic ability and sufficient other theological background.

Students wishing to take certain modules in Biblical Studies as part of their programme must demonstrate a proficiency in Greek or Hebrew at least to the standard of the pre-requisites identified for the relevant Oak Hill modules.
English language
requirements
Applicants must also satisfy the College that they have a sufficient command of spoken and written English to meet the demands of the programme. An applicant whose first language is not English will be expected to reach, at the point of application to Oak Hill College, a suitable minimum level of English language. We therefore require all applicants whose first language is not English to take an Academic IELTS test and achieve an overall score of 7.0 or above, with no less than 6.5 in each component.
Alternatives
International students
Please note that Oak Hill College does not have a Tier 4 licence and is therefore unable to sponsor applicants from outside the EU/EEA/Switzerland for a student visa. In addition please note that it is not possible to study at Oak Hill on the basis of:

• Tier 4 immigration permission issued for study at another UK educational institution
• A short-term study visa
• Any type of visitor visa

More information about this can be found on the UK government website:
Government website
Approved for ordinands
Yes.
Ordinands who are already Theology graduates would normally study the PGDip part time over 22 months alongside additional modules that make their overall programme full time. Alongside their Level 7 modules, ordinands will complete a suite of placements and will also study a selection of modules at Level 5 to provide specific Anglican training (as approved by the Church of England).
Applying
Our closing date for applications is Monday 11 May 2020, but do ensure you apply in good time as, if you’re concerned about accommodation, there are key dates that you’ll need to meet, as well as other things to allow time for in the application process.
How to apply
Programme Information
Mode

Full time

Full time students are expected to be in College five days a week, from Monday to Friday, and are required to attend all classes and fellowship group meetings, and to meet the requirements of their particular pathway as regards placements. Chapel takes place every weekday in the middle of the day and full time students are expected to attend every day.  There are no module classes on Wednesdays; on six Wednesdays each academic year, we invite in guest speakers to share their varied ministry experiences with students. We encourage students to treat being a full time student in the same way as having a full time job.

Part time

Part time students are required to attend all their classes and are expected to attend Chapel on the days that they are in College. Chapel takes place every weekday in the middle of the day.

Placements

PGDip students normally do not complete placements. However, Church of England ordinands taking the PGDip are required to complete placements.

Some of your training goals for ministry will be pursued in your placement which will also provide opportunities to develop some of the skills you are learning elsewhere in the curriculum. It will keep you focussed on ministry in the real world. It is college's responsibility to allocate placements,   

Ordinands are required to complete two years of a weekly church placement (MP1.7 and MP2.7).

For more details see below.

Placements
Learning, teaching and assessment
Pedagogy

Our ultimate aim is not just to impart information but to work towards the transformation of students as they reflect with others on loving Christ more deeply in order to explain him simply. We pursue the enhancement of teaching and learning within the College by fostering:

• habits in the lecturer of reflective, self-critical intentionality and innovation
• an ethos in the classroom of directed, dynamic and active learning
• an ethos amongst the faculty of collegiality, teachability and servant leadership
• an ethos in the College of coherence, excellence and doxology

Study hours and make up of study

Within Higher Education, it is generally understood that 1 credit = 10 hours of study, shared between class time, pre-class reading, private study and assessment.

This means that a 30 credit module = 300 hours of study. So for the PGDip, 120 credits = 1200 study hours over the course of the programme as a whole.

In-class learning involves lectures, seminars, discussions, worked examples and presentations. Out-of-class study involves reading, reflecting, researching, writing assignments, group projects and revision for exams.

Learning, teaching and assessment

The College aims to provide a learning experience which is demanding and exhilarating, reflecting the highest academic standards as well as excellence in pedagogy. The programme offers a rich and varied learning experience which encompasses lectures, seminars, language classes, field trips, placements and a range of formative and summative assessments. Through these assessments, the College aims to provide all students with an equal opportunity to demonstrate their achievement of Threshold Learning Outcomes (at module level) and Programme Learning Outcomes. Underlying all of the College’s programmes is a commitment both to information and to transformation, and a belief that the sub-disciplines within Theology are integrated within the framework provided by scripture, which can and does speak into every area of life.

You will be awarded the PGDip Theology once you have attained grade 12 or better in modules worth 120 credits at Level 7.

The PGDip Theology is closely related to the PGCert Theology (60 credits): a PGDip student who passes two taught modules (60 credits), including the core module BD6.4, but who does not meet the remaining programme requirements for the PGDip may be awarded a PGCert as an exit qualification.

The PGDip is also closely related to the MA Theology (180 credits): the two programmes draw on the same selection of taught modules and require the same number and distribution of modules. An MA student who passes the four taught modules (120 credits), including the core module BD6.4, but not the MA dissertation/project package (60 credits) may be awarded the PGDip as an exit qualification.

A PGDip student may be allowed to ‘top-up’ to registration for the MA Theology. There are strict deadlines for such an application, since a successful student needs to meet timing requirements for preparation of the MA dissertation package. A student who has successfully completed the PGDip may later apply to ‘top-up’ to the MA by completing the dissertation package in no more than one academic year part time. Any student registered for the MA but awarded the PGDip as the result of incompletion or failure of the dissertation may not subsequently apply to register to ‘top-up’ to the MA.

Pathways and modules
Pathway information

You must take all of:
• One compulsory module: BD6.4 Hermeneutics, Epistemology & the Knowledge of God (30 credits)
• Three elective modules (90 credits in total), at least one of which must be a taught Specialist Master’s-Level module (coded 6.x)
• Postgraduate Research Seminars (non-credit bearing).  These will normally take place monthly on a weekday evening: the details will be announced at the start of the academic year

Elective modules are offered subject to viability (based on class size) and the College reserves the right to withdraw an elective module if there is insufficient interest; not all elective modules are offered every year.

Requirements for Anglican ordinands: in addition to all elements of the PGDip set out above, you will complete a suite of placements and will also study a selection of modules at Level 5 to provide specific Anglican training (as approved by the Church of England). This will normally comprise MP1.7, BM2.1, MP2.3, MP2.7 and may include MP2.8:
• MP1.7 Weekly Church Placement I (0 credits)
• BM2.1 Word Ministry I (10 credits)
• MP2.3 Anglican Ministry (10 credits)
• MP2.7 Weekly Church Placement II (0 credits)
• MP2.8 Ministry/Mission Experience Placement (0 credits)

Ordinands will also take 100 credits of additional modules to take the total number of credits over two years to 240. These may be at any level of study (from Level 4 to Level 7).  The selection of these modules will be discussed and agreed as part of the admissions process.

These are the modules running in 2020/21. For a full list of the elective modules which are potentially available in any given year, please see the Programme Specification.

Semester 1
Semester 2
Compulsory
Elective modules
(90 credits)
BD6.4Hermeneutics, Epistemology & the Knowledge of God
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Module Tutors: Chris Ansberry, Kristi Mair, Tim Ward

 

Content: After introductory reflections on epistemology and hermeneutics, the module will progress in two movements. The first will establish the theological and epistemological foundations for our hermeneutical explorations. Here we will examine Christian accounts of human knowledge of God and creation in the light of the creator-created distinction, the fall of humanity and redemption, using biblical and other material. We will describe and examine key proposals for a sound epistemology in the western tradition, considering objections to these proposals from Sophism, Scepticism, Nihilism and post-modernism. And we will evaluate the hermeneutical and theological implications of these epistemologies, as well as their objections, using worked examples andscenarios. From this theological and epistemological foundation, the second partof the module will focus on hermeneutics in the stricter sense. Here we will describe and examine various hermeneutical approaches, devoting particular attention to their epistemological underpinnings, theological implications, and conception of the relationship among author, text and reader. We will focus onspecific hermeneutical issues, such as dual authorship, semiotics, the situated-ness of the reader and the relationship between interpretation and theology. And we will discuss fitting strategies for Christian appropriation ofhermeneutical disciplines in order to nurture Christian faith. Together, these theological, epistemological and hermeneutical discussions will provide a backdrop for the module assessments. For the seminar paper, students will describe and critically evaluate a major objection to human claims to knowledge, indicating possible well-framed Christian responses to that objection. For the exegetical paper, students will explore a passage relating to the knowledge of God but will use and critically evaluate different hermeneutical techniques in doing so. And for the event and written account, students will present sophisticated knowledge pertaining to the human knowledge of God to a non-technical audience and provide a critical evaluation of both the presentation and its specific subject matter.

 

Assessment: Seminar (30%); Exegesis (30%); Event and Written Account (40%)

 

Restrictions: Compulsory for MA, PGDip and PGCert Theology; Elective for MTheol Theology (TPS, TCC)

No module (MA and PGDip)
credits
Postgraduate Research Seminars
0 credits

These will normally take place monthly on a weekday evening: the details will be announced at the start of the academic year.

BS5.9General Epistles (Greek)
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Pre-Requisites: GK2.3 (Intermediate Biblical Greek), BL2.1 (Intermediate New Testament Greek) or demonstration of equivalent Greek proficiency

 

Module Tutors: Brad Bitner, Matthew Sleeman

 

Content: The General Epistles (e.g. Hebrews, 1-2 Peter, Jude) employ some of the most elegant and complex Greek of all the New Testament writings. They also make unique contributions to our understanding of the Gospel, the church and the Christian life. In this module students gain further, in-depth practice with Greek grammar, syntax and other exegetical skills as they study several select whole books with a view towards and advanced integration of exegesis, theological and pastoral reflection.

 

Assessment: Tests (Pass/Fail); Exegetical-TheologicalPaper (60%); Exam(s) (40%)

 

Restrictions: Elective for MTheol (TPS,TCC), MA and PGDip Theology; not available for the PGCert Theology; may not be taken by students who have previously credited BS4.9 or BL4.1

BD5.1Justification in the Bible & in Christian Doctrine
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Module Tutors: Matthew Bingham, Christopher Stead

 

Content: Justification has been called the article of Christian faith on which the church stands or falls. In this module students will explore in depth the biblical, theological and historical aspects of this doctrine that is so central to the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ and will consider how to apply it carefully to Christian life, mission and ministry. At postgraduate level a nuanced and sophisticated analysis of the doctrine and its application to contemporary culture is required as students present in class and engage in critical evaluation of set texts.

 

Assessment: Write up of Class Presentation (25%); Review and Comparison of two Books (35%); Exam (40%)

 

Restrictions: Elective for MTheol (TPS,TCC), MA and PGDip Theology; not available for the PGCert Theology; may not betaken by students who have previously credited BD4.1 or BD4.2

BD6.3New Testament Theology
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Module Tutors: Brad Bitner, David Shaw

 

Content: Introductory lectures will present the challenges and opportunities of unity and diversity in New Testament theology and will contextualise a series of set readings that epitomise the history of the discipline and locate the approach taught in this module. Students will draft a set of précis summarising assigned readings tobring to a series of class meetings as the basis for seminar discussions. Although these précis advance the word count of the module assessment, they will only require engagement with one major text, without the additional research called for by an essay. We will also determine the final number ofprécis required with the overall workload in mind. Further lectures will investigate the relationship between the New Testament and the Old Testament and the ways in which the New Testament uses the Old Testament. In addition, lectures with significant discussion components will explore key biblical-theological themes across New Testament texts and the unique manner in which certain individual New Testament texts contribute to biblical and systematic theology. The New Testament biblical theology paper will require each student to engage with an approved New Testament epistle and to unfold indetail its contribution to New Testament, biblical and systematic theology as well as preparing an appendix dealing with its application to a ministry context. A final exam will draw these elements together, assessing in particular the student’s critical engagement with issues of method in constructing and articulating a New Testament biblical theology on the basis of unseen set texts.

 

Assessment: Seminar Precis (20%); Biblical Theology Paper (50%); Exam (30%)

 

Restrictions: Elective for MTheol (TPS,TCC), MA, PGDip and PGCert Theology

DW5.2Global Theology & Practice
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Module Tutor: Keith Ferdinando

 

Content: We are often unaware of the significant role of culture in the formation of our theology and church practice. This module opens students’ minds to different patterns of theological thinking in various cultures and equips them with an advanced theoretical framework by which to evaluate contextualisation and theories of church planting in light of biblical criteria.

 

Assessment: Seminar Presentation (25%); Preparation of a Creedal Statement (35%); Essay (40%)

 

Restrictions: Elective for MTheol (TPSonly), MA and PGDip Theology; not available for the PGCert Theology; may not be taken by students who have previously credited DM4.3 or DW4.2 (and therefore not available for MTheol Theology (specialising in TCC))

DW6.1Christian Theology of World Religions
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Module Tutor: Dan Strange

 

Content: After some introductory lectures, we will read and discuss in class a number of seminal texts in the theology of religions. Students will then present a seminar on one scholar within the theology of religions. We will then focus in class on developing the constructive theology of religions using some recently published statements as a foundation for class discussion. Finally we will look at a number of contemporary missiologically based scenarios that might appear in ministry settings. For the essay, students will offer an extended piece of writing focusing on evangelical approaches to other religions and the impact ofthese on various pastoral and practical issues; the exam will offer a summative assessment of all of the knowledge areas listed above, as well as of students’ skills in textual analysis.

 

Assessment: Seminar (30%); Essay (40%); Exam (30%)

 

Restrictions: Either DW6.1 or CW6.2 compulsory for MTheol (TCC); otherwise elective for MTheol (TPS), MA, PGDip and PGCert Theology

BS5.2Advanced Biblical Hebrew Reading
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Pre-Requisites: HB3.3 (Reading Biblical Hebrew), BL4.2 (Reading Biblical Hebrew) or demonstration of equivalent Hebrew proficiency.

 

Module Tutor: Eric Ortlund

 

Content: The effective, regular use of Hebrew over the long haul in ministry will be best served if students develop proficiency at reading and understanding deeply the grammatical and syntactical features of larger sections of text from various Old Testament genres (including poetry). This module offers students extended practice in reading Hebrew aloud and in building deeper skills in order to achieve an advanced ability to read, interpret and apply the Hebrew text.

 

Assessment: Class Participation/Weekly VocabularyTests (25%); Mid-Term Translation Test (20%); Exam (55%) [Please note that this assessment package may change.]

 

Restrictions: Elective for MTheol (TPS, TCC), MA and PGDip Theology; not available for the PGCert Theology; may not be taken by students who have previously credited BS4.2 or BL4.3

RP6.6Master’s-Level Independent Research Project
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Dissertations Coordinator: Eric Ortlund

 

Content: After initiall ymeeting with the supervisor to produce a draft research plan, the student will receive another four further hours of supervision. Oral but not written feedback will be given on a draft or drafts of the work. The rest of the student’s time will be spent in research and writing. While the supervisor may comment on aspects of the work and suggest further reading, the student’s research and writing will demonstrate: their critical engagement with primary and secondary materials; their understanding of the field of study and the contribution of other disciplines to the topic of study; their originality inthe application of knowledge; their use of techniques applicable to their own research; depending on the nature of the research, their selection of and commentary upon appropriate methodologies for constructing the project; and their ability to formulate a constructive, coherent,well-informed argument. In some cases, it will also demonstrate the student’s understanding of and compliance with the principles of ethical research.

 

Assessment: Dissertation or Project, max. 7,500 words (100%)

 

Restrictions: Elective for PGDip and PGCert only; not available for MTheol (TPS, TCC) or MA Theology

BS5.5Wisdom Literature (Hebrew & English streams)
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Pre-Requisites: (Hebrew Stream): HB3.3 (Reading Biblical Hebrew), BL4.2 (Reading Biblical Hebrew) or demonstration of equivalent Hebrew proficiency

 

Module Tutor: Chris Ansberry

 

Content: Wisdom Literature (e.g. Proverbs, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, Job) is sometimes as neglected as it is precious for Christian life and ministry. This module offers students a coherent, detailed and advanced engagement with the Old Testament Wisdom Literature in either an English or Hebrew stream. The goal is the cultivation of skilful interpretation, reflection and application of biblical wisdom to the uncertainties, ambiguities and limits of knowledge with which life and ministry confront us.

 

Assessment: Book(s) Review (10%); Essay (40%); Unseen Exam (50%)

 

Restrictions: Elective for MTheol (TPS, TCC), MA and PGDip Theology; not available for the PGCert Theology; may not be taken by students who have previously credited BS4.4 or BL4.4

BS6.9Theology of the Book of Acts (Greek & English streams)
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Module Tutor: Matthew Sleeman

 

Content: A series of discursive classroom sessions will provide students with an overview of Acts as a narrative-theological text. This will be supplemented by set readings which will focus on particular loci within Acts scholarship. These will lead to group discussion. Coursework essays (leading to student-led class seminar-presentations) will variably facilitate, develop and assess the various threshold learning outcomes for the module. Students developing further Greek linguistic skills will receive classes – requiring preparatory work. Students will also develop their appreciation of first-century context, via directed self-reading and reflection. A final exam will draw these elements together.

 

Assessment: Seminar 1 (25%); Seminar 2 (25%); Exam (50%)

 

Restrictions: Elective for MTheol (TPS, TCC), MA, PGDip and PGCert Theology

RP6.7Master’s-Level Guided Reading
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

ModuleTutor: Dependent on Topic Chosen

 

Content: The class contact hours are spent discussing these texts and the issues they raise, with an eye on their use of Scripture and their pastoral applications. The bulk of the study hours will consist of independent reading of the set texts. The balance of contact time to other study time will vary depending on the needs of the student and how many students are taking this module at one time. The assessment consists of essays based on the stipulated readings; where appropriate the assignments may also be informed by other works consulted on the student’s own initiative and their wider exploration of the subject (max.total of 7,500 words). The number of essays (no more than three individual essays) will depend on the readings.

 

Assessment: Essays (up to three, no more than 7,500 words total)

 

Restrictions: ‘Taught’ Elective for MTheol (TPS, TCC), MA, PGDip and PGCert Theology by agreement with the Director of Postgraduate Studies and the proposed tutor; if the student is also taking RP6.2, RP6.3, RP6.4 or RP6.6, the study area must be sufficiently different from the dissertation/project topic as judged by the Faculty; students may notnormally take RP6.7 and RP6.8 together

RP6.7Master’s-Level Guided Reading
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

ModuleTutor: Dependent on Topic Chosen

 

Content: The class contact hours are spent discussing these texts and the issues they raise, with an eye on their use of Scripture and their pastoral applications. The bulk of the study hours will consist of independent reading of the set texts. The balance of contact time to other study time will vary depending on the needs of the student and how many students are taking this module at one time. The assessment consists of essays based on the stipulated readings; where appropriate the assignments may also be informed by other works consulted on the student’s own initiative and their wider exploration of the subject (max.total of 7,500 words). The number of essays (no more than three individual essays) will depend on the readings.

 

Assessment: Essays (up to three, no more than 7,500 words total)

 

Restrictions: ‘Taught’ Elective for MTheol (TPS, TCC), MA, PGDip and PGCert Theology by agreement with the Director of Postgraduate Studies and the proposed tutor; if the student is also taking RP6.2, RP6.3, RP6.4 or RP6.6, the study area must be sufficiently different from the dissertation/project topic as judged by the Faculty; students may notnormally take RP6.7 and RP6.8 together

RP6.8Master’s-Level Guided Reading in a Biblical Language
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Module Tutor: Dependent on Language Chosen

 

Content: Class time will consist mostly of discussion on the set texts and any linguistic issues, which students will be asked to prepare in advance of class. The bulk of the study hours will consist of independent reading of set texts and independent study of the chosen biblical language. Students may be asked to read sections of grammars and other readings related to the chosen biblical language. The assessment will consist of two tests that are focused on translation, as well as some or all of the following: grammar, syntax, literary features, poetry and theology. The first of these tests will be administered approximately half-way through the term, covering texts assigned up to the mid-term test; the second will be the final exam, and will cover assigned texts throughout the term, as well some unseen texts.

 

Assessment: Mid-Semester Test (30%); Final Exam (70%)

 

Restrictions: ‘Taught’ Elective for MTheol (TPS, TCC), MA, PGDip and PGCert Theology by agreement with the Director of Postgraduate Studies and the proposed tutor; students may not normally take RP6.7 and RP6.8 together

RP6.8Master’s-Level Guided Reading in a Biblical Language
30 credits

Module Level: Level 7

 

Module Tutor: Dependent on Language Chosen

 

Content: Class time will consist mostly of discussion on the set texts and any linguistic issues, which students will be asked to prepare in advance of class. The bulk of the study hours will consist of independent reading of set texts and independent study of the chosen biblical language. Students may be asked to read sections of grammars and other readings related to the chosen biblical language. The assessment will consist of two tests that are focused on translation, as well as some or all of the following: grammar, syntax, literary features, poetry and theology. The first of these tests will be administered approximately half-way through the term, covering texts assigned up to the mid-term test; the second will be the final exam, and will cover assigned texts throughout the term, as well some unseen texts.

 

Assessment: Mid-Semester Test (30%); Final Exam (70%)

 

Restrictions: ‘Taught’ Elective for MTheol (TPS, TCC), MA, PGDip and PGCert Theology by agreement with the Director of Postgraduate Studies and the proposed tutor; students may not normally take RP6.7 and RP6.8 together